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immersion

You will need:

Coffee of high quality, clean water, water boiler, grinder, kitchen scales, timer, spoon & french press (or kettle for “cowboy coffee”).

Steps to brew:

Step 1. Weigh out 70 grams of coffee for 1 liter of water.

Step 2. Grind it for filter – not too coarse

Step 3. Put the french-press or kettle on a kitchen scale to make sure you get the exact amount of water.  Pour a small amount of the hot water into the French press to preheat it. Be sure to discard the water before adding the coffee in the vessel. 

Step 4. Take the boiling water and let it sit for a minute before pouring 1000g onto the coffee. Make sure all coffee grounds are wet – use a spoon to stir directly after adding the water.  

Step 5. Leave the french-press to soak for 4 minutes using a timer to keep track on time. When the 4 minutes are up gently break the crust using the spoon.

Step 6. Skim off the foam on the top using one or two spoons

Step 7. Leave the brew for 5 more minutes or longer before gently pressing the mesh back down. This allows the loose particles in the coffee to sediment which will give you a very clean and smooth cup.

For the cowboy kettle you can do exactly the same as explained above.

Fun Tip:

Add a couple of grams of lemon juice or a few drops of vinegar to your brew water if you think that your coffee taste a bit chalky and flat. This will affect the alkalinity of the water and hopefully help extract more of the acidity in the coffee. This obviously depends on the water quality you have as a starting point but it is a cheap and very easy way to potentially brew much better tasting coffee without an advanced filtration system. We do not support using bottled water except for when it is a general health recommendation due to pour water quality. There is also several filter kettles in the market that is good for filtering tap water, removing particles, impurities, metals and carbonate hardness.

 

hario v6o / chemex

You will need:

Coffee of high quality, clean water, water boiler, grinder, kitchen scales, timer, V60 kit or a Chemex, pouring kettle with a fine nozzle

Steps to brew:

Step 1. Rinse the paper filter carefully with hot water and leave it to “dry” for preferably 5-10 minutes. Collect the rinsing water and if possible save it for watering plants, washing windows etc. 

Step 2. Weigh out 30 grams of coffee for 500ml of water

Step 3. Grind the coffee for filter and place it in the V60/Chemex

Step 4. Put the brewer on a kitchen scale and tare the scale

Step 5. Start the timer and immediately pour around 60-70ml of water over the coffee. Give it a couple of swirls to make sure all coffee grounds are soaked.

Step 6. After the 30 seconds pour a couple of small circles avoiding pouring on the paper filter and then go over to pouring steadily in the middle until you reach 250 g.

Step 7. At 1 minute start the third pour repeating the same technique – pour a couple of circles and then go back to the middle with a steady pour reaching 375ml.

Step 8. After 1 minute and 30 seconds start the last pour repeating previous pouring technique and pour up to 500ml finishing pouring after around 1.40-1.50 minutes.

Step 9. Let the water go through the coffee and remove the filter when it starts dripping slowly. The total brew time should be somewhere between 3-3.30 minutes.

Fun Tip:

Add a couple of grams of lemon juice or a few drops of vinegar to your brew water if you think that your coffee taste a bit chalky and flat. This will affect the alkalinity of the water and hopefully help extract more of the acidity in the coffee. This obviously depends on the water quality you have as a starting point but it is a cheap and very easy way to potentially brew much better tasting coffee without an advanced filtration system. We do not support using bottled water except for when it is a general health recommendation due to pour water quality. There is also several filter kettles on the market that is good for filtering tap water, removing particles, impurities, metals and carbonate hardness.

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